Research

Wisconsin Port Worker

Wisconsin’s marine freight system is a tremendous asset for both a strong economy as well as a healthy environment in the state. Research coming out of the National Center for Freight and Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison is helping multiple organizations and agencies target priority projects as they create and implement plans for the state’s freight infrastructure and economic development. Top among the priority projects identified were the state’s Marine Highways as well as repairs and upgrades to key ports. [click to continue…]

GKM Vsit to CFIRE

GKM Incorporated recently visited the UW–Madison campus to talk to students about how its platform supports the goals associated with Smart City initiatives, the current topic for CFIRE’s Transportation Management and Policy Program’s colloquium.

An innovative approach that transforms a negative into a positive for Wisconsin manufacturers and producers substantiates findings in research completed by the Center for Freight and Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Simply put, geography is an issue for Wisconsin shippers wishing to utilize intermodal rail—rail combined with other transportation modes such as trucking—as part of its supply chain. Chicago’s proximity results in Wisconsin shippers being held captive to the realities of the region’s freight system. As the busiest transcontinental rail gateway in the country with over 1,200 commuter, intercity passenger, and freight trains a day, Chicago is the heart of the continental freight rail system and exerts a gravitational mass that essentially creates a funnel for Wisconsin freight that wants to travel by rail. However, because of the regions’ congested rail system, getting freight through the Chicago gateway can take anywhere from hours to days, creating service and reliability issues for Wisconsin shippers. [click to continue…]

GIS Offers Powerful Insights for Researchers Hoping to Guide Transportation Policy

May 20, 2016

Several CFIRE projects were used to illustrate unique uses of Geographical Information System (GIS) data for a diverse group of people at the 2016 UW-Madison Geospatial Summit. The annual event brings together people interested in using GIS data in a wide range of fields. Ben Zietlow shared several case studies from a variety of research […]

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Strategies for Increasing Use of Existing Transportation Infrastructure

August 28, 2014

The construction and maintenance of new infrastructure is not always the best way of confronting congestion. In many cases, it is much less expensive to design policies that shift traffic to underutilized infrastructure. The Getting the Goods without the Bads: Freight Transportation Demand Management Strategies to Reduce Urban Impacts (CFIRE 07-02) project, led by CFIRE […]

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Estimation of Road Friction through Lab Results

August 27, 2014

Proper pavement texture is crucial to prevent road accidents, especially in wet conditions, but there are currently no minimum friction requirements in US road design. This is due mostly to the cost and difficulty of direct friction measurement that would be needed to confirm such requirements. This project proposes that friction, as well as noise […]

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Satellite Sensors Improve NO2 Detection

August 26, 2014

Advances in satellite technologies have led to improved estimates of air pollution emissions. In the United States, ground-level instruments are expensive, and typically limited to urban areas. However, air emissions from truck and rail are significant in rural areas, away from existing monitors. Satellite-mounted instruments have been used to measure changes in emissions, from expanding […]

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New Coatings Resist Corrosion in Pre-Stressed Concrete

August 25, 2014

Many construction projects use “pre-stressing” in their concrete sections, where steel strands are placed in tension before allowing concrete to set around them. When the tension is removed, the steel strands retain their strained shape and the concrete gains considerable compressive strength. Concrete cracks, however, expose the strands to corrosive compounds like salt and the […]

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