Lateral Deflection Contribution to Settlement Estimates

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 Project Brief  Final Report

Primary Investigators

James Schneider and Dante Fratta
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Abstract

The construction of tall embankments on soft soils often involves methods which incorporate staged construction. Consolidation during pauses in construction will lead to increase in effective stress and a gain in strength with time. Time dependent behavior of soils is highly uncertain, and the use of geotechnical instrumentation is required to better understand soil behavior during the construction process.

Vertical settlement and lateral displacements increase with embankment height. The location of vertical settlement gauges is often near the edge of an embankment, which may be in the zone of influence of the moving slope. Lateral movements may therefore influence vertical settlements measurements and inference of the average degree of consolidation during the construction process. The contribution of lateral deflection on the magnitude of measured settlement is not well defined and needs further analysis. This proposal aims to address uncertainty in the influence of lateral deflection on the magnitude of measured settlement through numerical and analytical analysis of cross sections related to the STH 29/USH 41 interchange, as well as through parametric studies of other soft soil conditions and embankment geometries. Field instrumentation from the STH 29/ USH 41 construction will be analyzed using numerical and analytical methods.

Objectives

This proposal aims to address uncertainty in the influence of lateral deflection on the magnitude of measured settlement through numerical and analytical analysis of cross sections related to the STH 29/USH 41 interchange, as well as through parametric studies of other soft soil conditions and embankment geometries.

Tasks

  1. Literature review
  2. Review and analysis of field data
  3. Modeling and instrumentation results
  4. Extrapolation to other sites and soil conditions

Project Information

  • Duration: 17 months
  • Dates: August 2011 – January 2013
  • Budget: $41,996
  • Student Involvement: One graduate student
  • Modal Orientation: Highway
  • Project ID: CFIRE 05-09
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