STEM

Consortium member, the Transportation and Logistics Management Research Center at the University of Wisconsin–Superior has hosted its second successful Transportation Day for Girl Scouts. By partnering with a local council of the Girl Scouts, Dr. Richard Stewart, the center’s director, has developed the day-long event that brings elementary and middle-school-aged girls to the UW–Superior campus to explore careers in transportation.

Transportation Day for Girl Scouts

CFIRE Sponsors UW-Superior Transportation Day for Girl Scouts

Stewart together with research associate, Cassie Roemhildt, built on knowledge shared by the Women in Trucking Association and pulled-in support from industry sponsors as well as from the National Center for Freight & Infrastructure Research & Education (CFIRE) to create this event.

This program was featured in the Midwest Transportation Workforce Center’s Success Stories Campaign at www.MTWC.org. The full story can be read here.

A tool with real-world applications for city planners as well as a robust survey of drone technologies were the highlights of the Spring 2016 end-of-semester symposium of the Transportation Management and Policy (TMP) program. The students presented their work on May 6th to a gathering of interested staff, faculty, other students, and a representative of the Madison Area Transportation Planning Board.

Tool for city planners

TMP students created a tool for city planners
that scores metropolitan districts based on transportation and health factors.

Eli Miller, a student in the TMP Colloquium and project assistant for CFIRE kicked off the symposium with a summary of key takeaways from the semester’s colloquium. The class studied drone technologies—more appropriately called Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, or UAVs. The students learned about the broad range of technologies that fall under this categorization. These include everything from the small, familiar-looking, hovering craft with four helicopter-like propellers that drone hobbyists have popularized to the 32,000 lb., airplane-shaped Global Hawk used by the U.S. military.

These technologies already fill many roles and are expanding their reach. Beyond entertaining hobbyists, UAVs serve roles where cost, safety, time, and task desirability are a factor. With these technologies, human labor costs are reduced, tasks that would be unsafe for people can be done remotely, certain tasks can be done more quickly, and undesirable jobs can be done without people.

The second presentation by Kirsten Brose, Daniel Handel, James Markosian, Eli Miller, and Chelsea Morrison outlined methods and results from their project to modify a national tool, making it more applicable for City Planners in Madison, Wisconsin. The students took on this real-world challenge for the Madison Sustainability Committee as part of their work in the TMP Practicum. [click to continue…]

2012 Wisconsin Regional Future City Competition

February 6, 2012

The 19th Annual Future City Competition was held at the Milwaukee School of Engineering’s Kern Center on Saturday, January 21.  Forty-two teams competed for the regional title and an all-expenses paid trip to the National Future City Competition Finals, February 17-22, 2012. This year, students were tasked with choosing an energy source and designing a […]

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2011 Wisconsin Regional Future City Competition

February 17, 2011

On January 22, 2011 the MSOE Kern Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin was filled with more than sixty teams from 19 different schools for the 2011 Wisconsin Regional Future City Competition. This year, students presented solutions to a timely challenge: provide a reliable and effective health care product or system that will improve the quality of […]

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